Early TT race history (1904–1910) + present day video

Motor racing began on the Isle of Man in 1904 with the Gordon Bennett Eliminating Trial and were originally restricted to touring automobiles. As the Motor Car Act 1903 placed a speed restriction of 20 mph on automobiles in the UK, Julian Orde, Secretary of the Automobile Car Club of Britain and Ireland approached the authorities in the Isle of Man for the permission to race automobiles on public roads. The Highways (Light Locomotive) Act 1904 gave permission in the Isle of Man for the 52.15 mile Highlands Course for the 1904 Gordon Bennett Eliminating Trial which was won by Clifford Earl (Napier) in 7 hours 26.5 minutes for 5 laps (255.5 miles) of the Highlands Course. The 1905 Gordon Bennett Trial was held on 30 May 1905 and was again won by Clifford Earl driving a Napier automobile in 6 hours and 6 minutes for 6 laps of the Highland Course. This was followed in September 1905 with the first Isle of Man Tourist Trophy Race for racing automobiles, now known as the RAC Tourist Trophy and was won by John Napier (Arrol-Johnston) in 6 hours and 9 minutes at an average speed of 33.90 mph.
Isle of Man TT 

International Motor-Cycle Cup Race (1905)
For the 1905 Gordon Bennett Eliminating Trial it was decided to run an eliminating trial for motorcycles the day after for a team to represent Great Britain in the International Motor-Cycle Cup Races. An accident at Ramsey Hairpin forced-out one of the pre-race favourites and the inability of the motorcycle competitors to climb the steep Mountain Section of the course forced the organisers to use a 25-mile section of the Gordon Bennett Trial course. This ran from Douglas south to Castletown and then north to Ballacraine along the primary A3 road and returned to the start at the Quarterbridge in Douglas via Crosby and Glen Vine along the current Snaefell Mountain Course in the reverse direction. The 1905 International Motor-Cycle Cup Race for 5 laps (125 miles) was won by J.S. Campbell (Ariel) despite a fire during a pit-stop in 4 hours, 9 minutes and 36 seconds at an average race speed of 30.04 mph.
Isle of Man TT Race (1907)




The Norton Twin motorcycle which won the first Isle of Man TT races in 1907.




BAT single-cylinder motorcycle
During the 1906 International Cup for Motor-Cycles held in Austria, the event was plagued by accusations of cheating and sharp practices. A conversation on the train journey home between the Secretary of the Auto-Cycle Club, Freddie Straight and the brothers from the Matchless motorcycle company, Charlie Collier and Harry Collier and the Marquis de Mouzilly St Mars led to a suggestion for a race the following year for road touring motorcycles based on the automobile races to be held in the Isle of Man on closed public roads. The new race was proposed by the Editor of “The Motor-Cycle” Magazine at the annual dinner of the Auto-Cycle Club held in London on 17 January 1907. It was proposed that the races would run in two classes with single-cylinder machines to average 90 mpg-imp (0.031 l/km) and twin-cylinder machines to average 75 mpg-imp (0.038 l/km) fuel consumption. To emphasise the road touring nature of the motorcycles, there were regulations for the inclusion of saddles, pedals, mudguards and exhaust silencers and the first event, the 1907 Isle of Man TT race, was won by Charlie Collier at an average race speed of 38.21 mph and the winner of the twin-cylinder class was Rem Fowler riding a Norton motorcycle at an average race speed of 36.21 mph.
For the 1908 race, the fuel consumption was raised to 100 mpg-imp (0.028 l/km) for single-cylinder machines and 80 mpg-imp (0.035 l/km) for twin-cylinder machines and the use of pedals was banned. The race was won by Jack Marshall on a Triumph motorcycle at an average speed of 40.49 mph. For the 1909 Isle of Man TT races, the fuel consumption regulations was abandoned along with the use of exhaust silencers. The single-cylinder machines were limited to a capacity of 500 cc and the twin-cylinder machines to a 750 cc engine capacity. Due to the concern over increasing lap-speed, for the 1910 Isle of Man TT the capacity of the twin-cylinder machines were reduced to 670 cc. However, Harry Bowen riding a BAT twin-cylinder motorcycle increased the lap record to an average speed of 53.15 mph (85.54 km/h), later crashing-out of the 1910 event on the wooden banking at Ballacraine corner.
Current


Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

The Italians have described this Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder café racer as a complete novelty in the world of motorcycling. The idea behind the Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder is that by turning the engine upside-down it can use
Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

THIS is the Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder, a prototype motorcycle that’s about to be put into limited production. The Nembo uses an 1814cc three-cylinder inverted engine.

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

The Nembo team were testing at the Franciacorta circuit in Italy. The final machine will use a larger, 1925cc engine.

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

The idea behind the Nembo 32 is that by turning the engine upside-down it can use the crankcase as a structural part of the chassis without putting any loads through the cylinders or cylinder head. The front and rear frame sections bolt straight to the crankcases while the cylinders and head just hang there.


It’s a wonderful looking motorcycle and we applaud it’s unique look. However, the downsides to the idea are not in short supply:

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle



1) All the delicate bits of the engine – the cam covers, cooling fins, electronics, spark plugs etc – are hanging down in the path of any rocks being thrown up from the front wheel.


2) The lubrication has got to be complex. Even with a dry sump and scavenge pump oil is going to try to collect in the cylinder head. It’s also going to work its way past the piston rings into the combustion chamber. Not good for performance, engine life or emissions.


3) It needs a long intake manifold to move the air intake up to a conventional position where there’s room for an airbox. That’s got to sap power.

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

4) The exhausts are in totally the wrong place. You can see from the design that they’ve struggled to get enough length into the pipes.


5) In terms of weight distribution they’ve put the crankshaft way higher than any conventional bike. That can’t be good, can it?


6) The swingarm pivot is very high. Again I’m not certain of the effect, but nobody else seems to want to do that in their designs.

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

7) If you were to drop it, the first thing to hit the ground would be the cylinder head. Which is fragile compared to a crankcase.

In short, there would be many, many easier ways to solve the problem than turning the engine upside down. Like, er, having a normal frame, for instance. All this design saves is a couple of bits of steel that would turn its two sub-frames into a single, conventional trellis. One that’s proven and doesn’t need a radical new engine design.

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder – Concept Motorcycle

Upside-down engines have been around since the dawn of time (for instance, most German WW2 fighters and bombers used them – notably the Messerschmitt 109). They were always known for using a lot of oil..

Summary :


The Italians have described this Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder café racer as a complete novelty in the world of motorcycling. The idea behind the Nembo 32 Inverted 3 Cylinder is that by turning the engine upside-down it can use,concept motorcycles,concept motorcycles,concept motorcycles 2012,concept motorcycles for sale,concept motorcycles 2011,concept motorcycles 2010,concept motorcycles 2009,concept motorcycles wallpapers,concept motorcycles ducati,concept motorcycles pictures,concept motorcycles v10
Via : http://www.visordown.com

1924 Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

Like the majority of their contemporaries, Norton relied on the sidevalve engine until the 1920′s, when the existing and well-tried 490cc unit was used as a basis for the firm’s first overhead-valve design. 
1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

Penned by James Lansdowne Norton himself, and first seen in prototype form in 1922, the overhead-valve Norton made little impact in that year’s Senior TT, though at Brooklands D.R.O’Donovan raised the world 500cc kilometre record to over 89 mph using the new motor. 
A road-going-version -the Model 18- was catalogued for 1923, quickly establishing a reputation for both speed and reliability when a standard engine assembled from parts was used to set a host  of records, including a new 12 hours mark. 
Racing continued to improve the breed -when Alec Bennet won the Senior TT for Norton- as a direct result of the works team’s experiences. 

1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

After Rem Fowler’s win at the 1907 Tourist Trophy on the Isle of Man, James Norton set aside the Peugeot two-cylinder engine, which he had also installed on some of his production models. Now Norton set out to build a more modern four-stroke, single-cylinder engine that would better suit his light and maneuverable chassis.

1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

The first successful Norton single-cylinder was a racing model with side valves on the cylinder. This motorcycle’s career lasted from 1912 until the early 1920s. During this period both the chassis and the engine were extensively modified, as technology evolved along with racing experience. In 1923 the side-valve single-cylinder engine was replaced by a new model that incorporated all the improvements that had been introduced in the earlier version.

1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

The new Norton had head valves set at a 100° angle, with long rods and rockers exposed. This vehicle weighed about 290 pounds and had 25 h.p.
The side-valve model Norton had set hour world records again and again, and the new version also set hour records, including a distance of some eighty-seven miles in one hour in 1924. The new motorcycle was a success in road racing as well, winning the 1924 and 1926 editions of the Senior Tourist Trophy.

1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.

Motorcycle: 1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.
 Manufacturer: Norton Motors Ltd., Aston,
Birmingham Type: Racing Year: 1924
Engine: Norton single-cylinder, four-stroke, overhead valve distribution, rod and rocker. Displacement 490.1 cc. (79 mm. x 100 mm.)
Cooling: Air
Transmission: Three-speed separate Power: 25 h.p.
Maximum speed: Over 90 m.p.h.
Chassis: Single cradle, tubular, open below. Front, elastic suspension
Brakes: Front, side drum; rear, pulley wedge (later side drum)
Via ; http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/

Summary



1924  Norton 500cc OHV Model 18.
Like the majority of their contemporaries, Norton relied on the sidevalve engine until the 1920′s, when the existing and well-tried 490cc unit was used as a basis for the firm’s first overhead-valve design. 
Penned by James Lansdowne Norton himself, and first seen in prototype form in 1922, the overhead-valve Norton made little impact in that year’s Senior TT, though at Brooklands D.R.O’Donovan raised the world 500cc kilometre record to over 89 mph using the new motor. ,
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Buell 1125 ~ Rex Marsee Concept Motorcycle

Larry Brinker and Rex Marsee  acquired this original Buell 1125  and set about modifying it. They expected the bike to be very popular , and a great platform for tuning and other custom parts. A great business model given the un foreseeability of H-D’s axe falling on the brand a few years later. 
Buell 1125 ~ Rex Marsee Concept Motorcycle

The thoroughness of their approach is evidenced by the fact that the bike was completely disassembled before the frame, wheels and other components were powder coated grey. The original fairing was replaced with a mini-variant together with a pair of small, vertically stacked headlights. Air scoops were fabricated to extend over both sides of the air intake and blend into the radiator scoops.


From the back, the huge stock plate, signal, and taillight bracket has been replaced by a single compact unit that fits into the original mounting location, becoming almost invisible from the side. The stock signals have been replaced by tiny models. The rear passenger pegs have been replaced by fabricated grab handles that double as tiedown locations.


The original café style bars were replaced with motocross bars, creating a much more comfortable riding position.

Buell 1125 ~ Rex Marsee Concept Motorcycle
Not content with these cosmetic and functional changes to the bodywork and chassis, Larry and Rex decided to develop their own exhaust system with the help of Big Gun. The unit they developed is tucked in neatly, and does away with the need for a heat guard. This attractive unit posed considerable tuning challenges, however, but after modifying the intake and fuel injection mapping, the pair ultimately coaxed an additional 4 hp from the already efficient stocker, along with a beefier torque curve. The new exhaust also dropped a boat load of weight. In total, roughly 40 pounds were removed from the Buell 1125R.



I took a brief ride on this naked monster. It was nimble, and the weight reduction was evident. The fuel injection was rough, however, and the bike is definitely too loud for road use in its current state. I understand that there is an insert available for the exhaust, however, that can bring the decibels down to a more acceptable level.


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Source http://rexmarseeconcepts.com/

Coventry Eagle Motorcycles

Imagination pictures the Roaring Twenties as a time of long summer days, a punt on the river, blazers and broad-bottomed flannel bags and voh-de-oh-doh music from a wind-up portable phonograph; and somewhere not far away, there would be a long lean-looking bike with a bulbous tank and powerful 976cc vee-twin engine. A Brough Superior? Possibly, though not necessarily, because there were plenty of other models in the Brough mould —like AJW, fvlcEvoy, Coventry-B And D, Grindlay Peerless, and Croft Cameron. And there was Coventry Eagle, the most Brough-like of them all.
Coventry Eagle Motorcycles



Yet it would be a mistake to discount the Coventry Eagle Flying Eight as just a slavish copy. It was more a case of ‘great minds think alike’, because George Brough and Percy Mayo were student friends who, as World War I came to a close, would often talk far into the night about the dream bikes that each would build, once peace came again.
Percy unveiled his masterpiece in late 1922. It was, said the trade press, ‘particularly handsome and symmetrical. As a fast touring machine, the new 976cc twin suggests unlimited possibilities.’

Coventry Eagle Motorcycles

They commented also that the finish was of the very finest—and so it was, with the bullnosed saddle tank (used on smaller Coventry Eagles for the past season, be it noted) decked out in black and carmine red.
The engine was the JAP side-valve Super Sports, and though the new bike had no model name when first announced, it soon gained the title of Flying Eight. The ‘eight’ was a reference to its nominal 8hp classification—not its power output, of course, but
assessed from a Royal Automobile Club formula based on piston diameter.

Coventry Eagle Motorcycles

From the start, it had all-chain drive and a three-speed Sturmey Archer gearbox, and despite the daunting price of £145 (extremely high for the period) it attracted a discerning clientele.
For 1924 the model underwent a complete redesign adopting Best and Lloyd mechanical lubrication, balloon tyres, large-diameter ball races in the steering head, and a much heavier frame in which the lower tank rails and rear sub-frame tubes were duplicated. Also, a very big step forward, Lucas Magdyno electric lighting was standardized.


There were even better things to come from Coventry Eagle, however. They enlisted the aid of Brooklands racing star Bert Le Vack, and Bert’s track experience led to the development of a whole family of Flying Eights for the 1925 season, all making use of a lighter yet stronger frame. Other details included a Webb centre-spring front fork, Sin-diameter Royal Enfield brakes and, on the top-of-the-range model, a Jardine gearbox.


That top model employed for the first time an overhead-valve 976cc twin —the same JAP power unit as that found in George Brough’s new SS100 Brough Superior. There was a standard two-cam side-valve at £120, a four-cam side-valve (this was another new JAP motor, powering the Brough SS80) at £ 135, and the overhead valve job at £ 165. Oddly enough, in each instance these prices were just £5 under those of the equivalent Brough Superior. Coincidence or collusion?

Coventry Eagle Motorcycles
Apart from cosmetic changes such as a more handsome headlamp, a better layout of the twin exhaust pipes, and the adoption of Whispering Ghost silencers, there was little further change in the make-up of the Flying Eight. One more version was added in 1927 only, a bargain-price two-cam side valve offered without electric lighting and it could be that this was an attempt to clear the decks, prior to a change of policy by the Mayo family.



That year there had been a significant addition to the Coventry Eagle programme, in the form of a Villiers-powered two-stroke in a new pressed-steel frame. The last Flying Eights were catalogued for I929, and by then the teething troubles of the pressed-steel frame had been overcome. The future, reckoned the Mayos, lay not so much in expensive vee-twins as in cheap commuter models. Time was to prove them right.

Coventry Eagle Motorcycles



Specifications


(1922 model) engine
Air-cooled, four-stroke, twin-cylinder.
85-5 mm (3 36in) boreX 85 mm (3-34in) stroke = 976cc (59-80cu in). Maximum power 28 bhp. Compression ratio 6-5:1. Two valves per cylinder operated by pushrods from single camshaft. Single carburettor transmission
Jardine three-speed gearbox Chain drive to rear wheel frame
Open tubular suspension
Front – Druid Girder fork Rear – Solid unsprung brakes
Front – Drum. Rear – Drum weight 385lb (175kg) performance
Maximum speed—not known


Source Super by Bikes Loure Caddell

Summary

Coventry-Eagle was a British motorcycle manufacturer. Established as a Victorian bicycle maker, the company began under the name of Hotchkiss, Mayo & Meek. The company name was changed to Coventry Eagle in 1897 when John Meek left the company . By 1898 they had begun to experiment with motorised vehicles and by 1899, had produced their first motorcycle. The motorcycles were hand built from components and finished carefully, Coventry-Eagle motorcycles proved reliable and by the First World War the range included Villiers_Engineering and JAP engines.
During the early 1920s, the models changed depending on what engines were available and the company swapped between four engine manufacturers. The model Flying 8 was probably the most iconic bike of its time and bore a resemblance to the contemporarythe Brough Superior. During the depression of the 1930s, the company concentrated on producing two-strokes. Production continued until the start of the Second World War in 1939    ,vintage Motorcycle,vintage motorcycles,vintage motorcycle helmets,vintage motorcycle jacket,vintage motorcycle parts,vintage motorcycle tires,vintage motorcycle goggles,vintage motorcycle racing,vintage motorcycle t shirts,vintage motorcycle boots,vintage motorcycle values

1923 British Anzani 996 Record Racer

Alessandro Anzani moved from Milan to France in the early years of the twentieth century. He had great mechanical skills, a passion for speed, and a consuming ambition for personal success. He had had his first contacts with motor vehicles in Italy, but it was in France that he excelled, both as racer and engine designer.
1923 British Anzani 996 Record Racer

Anzani went into business for himself and built a three-cylinder radial engine, then he built the engine that made it possible for Bleriot to become the first man to fly a plane across the English Channel. Anzani was the first designer to maintain that the radial engine should not rotate together with the propeller.
The engines that Anzani built in the plants he founded in Milan, Courbe-voie, and London were used for motorcycles and airplanes. He built only engines, not the vehicles they powered. In 1923 British Anzani built a large-displacement two-cylinder V
Motorcycle: British Anzani 996 Record Racer engine. It was mounted on a sturdy double chassis’ vith an elastic front fork similar to those in Harley-David-son motorcycles. This new motorcycle was ridden by Temple to win its first race at Brooklands on May 26, 1923. On November 10 of that year Temple again rode the British Anzani, setting a new world speed record of 108.48 m.p.h. He rode one lap at about 114 m.p.h.

1923 British Anzani 996 Record Racer

Manufacturer: British Anzani Engine Co., London
Type: Racing and world record Year: 1923
Engine: British Anzani two-cylinder V, 57°, four-stroke, with single-shaft overhead distribution, two bevel gear shafts. Displacement 995.5 cc. (83 mm. x 92 mm.)
Cooling: Air
Transmission: Three-speed separate Power: About 58 h.p. Maximum speed: About 115 m.p.h. Chassis: Continuous, tubular, double
cradle. Front, elastic suspension; rear
rigid
Brakes: Rear, side drum

summary 
Alessandro Anzani moved from Milan to France in the early years of the twentieth century. He had great mechanical skills, a passion for speed, and a consuming ambition for personal success. He had had his first contacts with motor vehicles in Italy, but it was in France that he excelled, both as racer and engine designer. intage Motorcycle,vintage motorcycles,vintage motorcycle helmets,vintage motorcycle jacket,vintage motorcycle parts,vintage motorcycle tires,vintage motorcycle goggles,vintage motorcycle racing,vintage motorcycle t shirts,vintage motorcycle boots,vintage motorcycle values

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

Then the prototypes of the ABC first appeared in 1919  they featured one of the most advanced specifications of any motorcycle up to that date. 
1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

The ABC was fitted with front and rear suspension, front and rear drum brakes, a four-speed gearbox, a mmli-plate clutch unit, and a tubular cradle frame. 

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE



The 398cc flat twin engine was mounted transversely in the frame and had overhead valves. In many ways the ABC was a forerunner of the BM\V transverse twin that appeared in Germany in 1923  though because it was fitted with rear suspension the British machine had chain drive. The rigid-framed BMW used a shaft.

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

The light weight of the ABC promised good performance despite the small-capacity engine. Front and rear springing promised a comfortable ride. On both counts the ABC delivered. The ABC illustrated is a 1921 model. Originally made in England, the bikes were made under licence in France by aircraft engine-makers Gnome & Rhone between 1920 and 1924

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

1919 ABC MOTORCYCLE

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Summary ,

ABC motorcycles was a British motorcycle manufacturer established in 1914 by Ronald Charteris in London. Several British motorcycle firms started up with the name “ABC”, including Sopwith. The All British Engine Company Ltd. of London was founded in 1912 and later changed to ABC Motors Ltd. With chief engineer Granville Bradshaw, Charteris built a range of engines throughout the First World War. From 1913 ABC produced motorcycle engines.
In 1918, ABC made a motorcycle with a 500 cc flat-twin engine mounted with its cylinders across the frame, several years before BMW adapted the design. Bradshaw challenged BMW’s use of his patented design in 1926. In 1919 ABC also produced the Scootamota – an early motor scooter. The company stopped producing motorcycles after 1923 because of competition from cheaper manufacturers ,Vintage Motorcycle,vintage motorcycles,vintage motorcycle helmets,vintage motorcycle jacket,vintage motorcycle parts,vintage motorcycle tires,vintage motorcycle goggles,vintage motorcycle racing,vintage motorcycle t shirts,vintage motorcycle boots,vintage motorcycle values